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Motorycle For Sale 1985 Yamaha VMAX for Sale

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sbeltroc

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Bike is in great condition, has very low mileage (26750 km) leisurely driven mainly on weekends, in and around town.
I am the second owner since 1988 and always kept the bike well maintained and stored in a heated garage over the winter.
New fuel pump, new fuel filter, new battery, new oil filter, tires very good condition, carbs cleaned and rebuilt like new, SuperTrapp exhaust.

Price: $7000 CAD

Yamaha: V Max | eBay
 

Parminio

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That's going to be a tough sell.

The 1985 only came in two colors: Burgundy and a Purple-Blue. So you don't have the factory paint, it may not even be the factory parts, you don't have the factory exhaust and it's got quite a bit of miles on it.

I wish you best of luck, but you're asking pristine factory collectible money for an '85 that's nowhere near that.
 

Fire-medic

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I don't think the mileage is excessive it's about 18,000 miles. Something of interest is the white and red stamp on the steering head that signifies it as a Canadian Market bike. The other thing of interest is the last four of the VIN. It's a bit hard for me to tell is it a black paint job? Do the frame aluminum side panels have stick on V-Max emblems?
 
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sbeltroc

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I don't think the mileage is excessive it's about 18,000 miles. Something of interest is the white and red stamp on the steering head that signifies it as a Canadian Market bike. The other thing of interest is the last four of the VIN. It's a bit hard for me to tell is it a black paint job? Do the frame aluminum side panels have stick on V-Max emblems?
Yes, black paint.
Frame side panels have Vmax emblems engraved/stamped - not a stick on.
 
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Fire-medic

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And the last four of the VIN are? Do you have a pic of the Canadian sticker on the steering head by the VIN number?
 

sbeltroc

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And the last four of the VIN are? Do you have a pic of the Canadian sticker on the steering head by the VIN number?
As indicated in the eBay post, this is the entire VIN number: JYA1GR005FA000983, there are no other digits.
There is an mechanical safety inspection sticker from the department of transportation from the province of Quebec, its blue and white. Its just proof that it passed inspection and is safe and legal to drive on the road. There is no other sticker. Is that what you want to see?
 

Fire-medic

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There have been pics of a Canadian white sticker, w/a a black outline maple leaf, and black copy, about the bike being for the Canadian market. It's that to-which I was referring. The XXXX983 means it's the 882nd bike for whatever market is on the white steering stem label. They start bikes at #101. The sales tally for USA 1985 bikes is 8,800 so it's a fairly early production, though there really isn't any special value-added for that VIN #.

Someone can correct me if I'm wrong, but the Canadian bikes were sticky-VIN badged on the label on the steeering stem as being for the USA market, and the white stamp-sized label with the black outline maple leaf and black copy was added to show it was directed to the Canadian market. You can see this bike is labelled December 1984 so it would be an early 1985 model year production.

VMax Canadian Transport sticker.jpeg

You see the CMVSS, that stands for Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, and is the official proof that the vehicle in question meets Canadian safety standards at the time of its manufacture. The digits in the middle of the maple leaf are unique to a manufacturer, and that would suppose in this case, that 506 belongs to Yamaha Corp. Canada.


More on this from the AHJ-Canadian authority having jurisdiction:

6. Demonstration of Compliance (Self-Certification Regime)
National Safety Marks
National Safety Marks ( NSM ) are used to indicate the compliance of a vehicle or equipment with the Act and attendant regulations and safety standards. National Safety Marks ( NSM ) are defined in section 2 and Section 3 the Motor Vehicle Safety Act. The Minister of Transport authorizes their use and any company that intends to use a NSM must apply to the Minister to obtain this authorizationFootnote3.

Compliance certification to applicable standards and regulations is the responsibility of the manufacturer of the vehicle or equipment via a “self-certification” regime. Vehicle manufacturers affix a compliance labelFootnote4 to their vehicles to indicate that the vehicles comply with the applicable standards. New vehicles manufactured in Canada and shipped inter-provincially must include a National Safety Mark (NSM) drawing on or beside the compliance label. Imported vehicles may use a prescribed statement on the compliance label instead of a National Safety Mark. Tires manufactured in Canada and shipped inter-provincially do not require a compliance label but must have a National Safety Mark molded into them. Imported tires must be accompanied by a written declaration from the manufacturer or its duly authorized representative that the tire conforms to the prescribed standards for a tire of that class at the time the tire was manufactured. Restraint systems and booster seats, whether imported or manufactured in Canada for inter-provincial shipment, must have a National Safety Mark and a product information label affixed to them.


Also from the above document:

Vehicle Importation
Vehicles Purchased at the Retail Level in the United States
The Motor Vehicle Safety Act requires that all vehicles imported into Canada comply with the Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations and associated Canada Motor Vehicle Safety Standards ( CMVSS ). However, subsection 7(2) of the Act provides an exception whereby vehicles purchased at the retail level in the United States that are not in full compliance with the CMVSS may be imported into Canada provided the vehicles were originally manufactured to comply with all applicable U.S. federal laws and can be modified to comply with the CMVSS . In 1995, Transport Canada contracted with a private company to develop and operate the Registrar of Imported Vehicles ( RIV ) program. Once modified, vehicles must be inspected by the RIV, which is responsible for inspecting and verifying that all necessary modifications to bring the vehicle into CMVSS compliance have been completed for vehicles being imported into Canada from the United States.

Detailed information on the importation process, questions and answers, and a list of vehicles admissible from the United States is available from the Registrar of Imported Vehicles at www.riv.ca and from Transport Canada’s importation web page.

Vehicles manufactured and designed for sale in other countries are typically not constructed to meet North American standards, nor can they be modified to meet Canadian requirements. A manufacturer must certify a vehicle at the time of main assembly, which makes it impossible for a company to modify a vehicle and re-certify its compliance after the date of manufacture.

The final authority having jurisdiction:


Anyone who has questions about these Guidelines on Compliance and Enforcement or who wishes further information about the enforcement procedures should contact:

Director, Motor Vehicle Regulations Enforcement
Motor Vehicle Safety Directorate
Transport Canada
330 Sparks Street
Ottawa ON K1A 0N5

[end]
It's possible that a sticker from a Canadian registration previously done:

(the) mechanical safety inspection sticker from the department of transportation from the province of Quebec
post #9

may carry some weight in this legal process, so do not attempt to remove that sticker you have! Especially if the 'maple leaf' CMVSS is not there!

A clear, unobstructed shot of the entire VIN sticker, (and any additional stickers like the maple-leaf outline CMVSS sticker) showing for what market it was built, and the month/year, may lend credibility to the process of legally registering the motorcycle in the USA, Canada, or elsewhere.
 
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sbeltroc

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There have been pics of a Canadian white sticker, w/a a black outline maple leaf, and black copy, about the bike being for the Canadian market. It's that to-which I was referring. The XXXX983 means it's the 882nd bike for whatever market is on the white steering stem label. They start bikes at #101. The sales tally for USA 1985 bikes is 8,800 so it's a fairly early production, though there really isn't any special value-added for that VIN #.

Someone can correct me if I'm wrong, but the Canadian bikes were sticky-VIN badged on the label on the steeering stem as being for the USA market, and the white stamp-sized label with the black outline maple leaf and black copy was added to show it was directed to the Canadian market. You can see this bike is labelled December 1984 so it would be an early 1985 model year production.

View attachment 78932

You see the CMVSS, that stands for Canadian Motor Vehicle Safety Standards, and is the official proof that the vehicle in question meets Canadian safety standards at the time of its manufacture. The digits in the middle of the maple leaf are unique to a manufacturer, and that would suppose in this case, that 506 belongs to Yamaha Corp. Canada.


More on this from the AHJ-Canadian authority having jurisdiction:

6. Demonstration of Compliance (Self-Certification Regime)
National Safety Marks
National Safety Marks ( NSM ) are used to indicate the compliance of a vehicle or equipment with the Act and attendant regulations and safety standards. National Safety Marks ( NSM ) are defined in section 2 and Section 3 the Motor Vehicle Safety Act. The Minister of Transport authorizes their use and any company that intends to use a NSM must apply to the Minister to obtain this authorizationFootnote3.

Compliance certification to applicable standards and regulations is the responsibility of the manufacturer of the vehicle or equipment via a “self-certification” regime. Vehicle manufacturers affix a compliance labelFootnote4 to their vehicles to indicate that the vehicles comply with the applicable standards. New vehicles manufactured in Canada and shipped inter-provincially must include a National Safety Mark (NSM) drawing on or beside the compliance label. Imported vehicles may use a prescribed statement on the compliance label instead of a National Safety Mark. Tires manufactured in Canada and shipped inter-provincially do not require a compliance label but must have a National Safety Mark molded into them. Imported tires must be accompanied by a written declaration from the manufacturer or its duly authorized representative that the tire conforms to the prescribed standards for a tire of that class at the time the tire was manufactured. Restraint systems and booster seats, whether imported or manufactured in Canada for inter-provincial shipment, must have a National Safety Mark and a product information label affixed to them.


Also from the above document:

Vehicle Importation
Vehicles Purchased at the Retail Level in the United States
The Motor Vehicle Safety Act requires that all vehicles imported into Canada comply with the Motor Vehicle Safety Regulations and associated Canada Motor Vehicle Safety Standards ( CMVSS ). However, subsection 7(2) of the Act provides an exception whereby vehicles purchased at the retail level in the United States that are not in full compliance with the CMVSS may be imported into Canada provided the vehicles were originally manufactured to comply with all applicable U.S. federal laws and can be modified to comply with the CMVSS . In 1995, Transport Canada contracted with a private company to develop and operate the Registrar of Imported Vehicles ( RIV ) program. Once modified, vehicles must be inspected by the RIV, which is responsible for inspecting and verifying that all necessary modifications to bring the vehicle into CMVSS compliance have been completed for vehicles being imported into Canada from the United States.

Detailed information on the importation process, questions and answers, and a list of vehicles admissible from the United States is available from the Registrar of Imported Vehicles at www.riv.ca and from Transport Canada’s importation web page.

Vehicles manufactured and designed for sale in other countries are typically not constructed to meet North American standards, nor can they be modified to meet Canadian requirements. A manufacturer must certify a vehicle at the time of main assembly, which makes it impossible for a company to modify a vehicle and re-certify its compliance after the date of manufacture.

The final authority having jurisdiction:


Anyone who has questions about these Guidelines on Compliance and Enforcement or who wishes further information about the enforcement procedures should contact:

Director, Motor Vehicle Regulations Enforcement
Motor Vehicle Safety Directorate
Transport Canada
330 Sparks Street
Ottawa ON K1A 0N5

[end]
It's possible that a sticker from a Canadian registration previously done:

(the) mechanical safety inspection sticker from the department of transportation from the province of Quebec
post #9

may carry some weight in this legal process, so do not attempt to remove that sticker you have! Especially if the 'maple leaf' CMVSS is not there!

A clear, unobstructed shot of the entire VIN sticker, (and any additional stickers like the maple-leaf outline CMVSS sticker) showing for what market it was built, and the month/year, may lend credibility to the process of legally registering the motorcycle in the USA, Canada, or elsewhere.
Thanks for the information, very informative, and appreciated. Here is a pic of the CMVSS :)
IMG_20210811_1812579.jpg
 

Fire-medic

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With that anyone in Canada should have no issues getting that titled, or however it's done there, assuming the bike hasn't been altered from stock specs beyond what is allowed under your motor vehicle code.

Does the big badge say it's built to USA standards? It appears that bikes of that era are eligible for use in Canada if the bike meets the USA standards. Plus, you have the 'maple-leaf.'
 

V-Four

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Price seems high to me.. but, that's me.

Also, maybe just me, but this looks odd. 🤔

The rear exhaust "shields" look like there was lotta heat there at one point or another. (especially the right side) Unless its rust/dirt/something? Looks like heat color to me though. Not sure what that would mean, but I don't reckon I've seen that before. If it IS from heat, I think it would have to be REALLY hot to discolor that outer dealio, rather than just the pipe underneath.


Max canada.jpg

If im wrong, please correct me.


🍻
T$
 

patate657

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Price seems high to me.. but, that's me.

Also, maybe just me, but this looks odd. 🤔

The rear exhaust "shields" look like there was lotta heat there at one point or another. (especially the right side) Unless its rust/dirt/something? Looks like heat color to me though. Not sure what that would mean, but I don't reckon I've seen that before. If it IS from heat, I think it would have to be REALLY hot to discolor that outer dealio, rather than just the pipe underneath.


View attachment 78960

If im wrong, please correct me.


🍻
T$
Mine came like that. It was a discoloration, but didn't look like heat made it. But that was mine...
 

Parminio

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Looks like heat color to me though. Not sure what that would mean, but I don't reckon I've seen that before.
I'm thinking it may have been ridden in the cold when they had salt on the roads. Salt will do that. Notice the pipes have the same tint.

You ride in that stuff and don't wash the bike down really good, you'll get that coloring too.
 

Sniper Predator

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I noticed that right off myself. Reason is my Gen 1 V-Max is also a 1985. When I purchased it I was the second owner of the bike as well and the original owner never had any problems and the bike was mint with 4,800 miles. The bike was solid with no overheating and the bike had the original exhaust pipes on it. Anyway....

My exhaust shield was just like that in the picture as well. I asked one of the lead mechanics at the local Yamaha shop why it looked like that and he told me it was because the aluminum under the clear paint that came from the factory had oxidized underneath over the years. What I did was sanded down the aluminum flat sides of the aluminum pieces and it shined up just fine with some Never-Dull. With the black paint recessed down inside the grooves and the shiny part showing, it looked amazing and still does to this day.
 

maleko89

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Mine came like that. It was a discoloration, but didn't look like heat made it. But that was mine...
Agree. If memory serves these are plastic and can change color. The headers in the rear are single walled so get damn hot.
 
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