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96 sitting for 4 + years.

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mjsinil

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My 96 I bought 2 weeks ago had been sitting for 4+ yeas before I bought it. It started right up with new battery and fresh gas, but runs rough. I have sync gages that I used on my 76 Goldwing, should I do this first on this bike or is there something else I should do first? The previous owner said he had done valve adjustments and carb rebuild, but at least 4 years ago....
 

Fire-medic

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Put your location under your avatar, someone on here may-be local to you. I see Belleville IL from another post.

Four years, did you try to drain the float bowls before putting gas into it? Any gas that was there 4 years-ago has long-since turned to gooey varnish, most-likely.

You probably need a carburetor disassembly and cleaning. Check in the -how-to' section. Probably your pilot jets are plugged, and you should check your float levels when the carbs are apart.
VMax FloatLevel bowl off.jpgVMax carbs disassembled for soaking.jpgVMax pilot jet.jpg
 
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mjsinil

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Yes, I did drain the bowls. old gas was surprisingly not too bad and not a lot in the tank or bowls. I’ll remove the carbs and do a good cleaning. Thanks
 

MaxMidnight

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Before stripping the carbs I would run some fuel system cleaner through first which will (at least) start the cleaning process and if the planets are aligned may even do the job for you.
I would also change all the fluids and filters plus do a full service (check sheet here).
Just 'cos someone says they have done something it doesn't mean the they have and if they have it doesn't mean to say they have done it right.
 

Parminio

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Run two tanks of super unleaded with some Seafoam added to it. If that doesn't sort it out, nothing will and you need to pull the carbs.

But that's easier, cheaper, and trust me it works about half the time. I speak from experience with mine being stored up when I was fighting cancer.

1596627600925.png
 

Fire-medic

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If there was any gasoline in the carb bowls, and the bike was last on the road, or run four years prior, you need to disassemble the carbs and to clean them. Mr. Midnight is very-optimistic! Sure, why-not, but in the end, they will need a disassembly and soak, a blow-job, and careful re-assembly with proper parts and care to setting things like the bench float level.

robmac is correct upon a thorough inspection of the gas tank; also include the fuel lines, and the fuel filter. The tank interior should be shiny-bright (assuming that it has-not been coated with some type of tank sealant), especially upon the bottom. Anthing less, and you need to determine why-not, and then undertake the steps to return it to good appearance and good operational condition. The gas filter should be replaced. Slit it open and study the media's 'captures,' what crud was in-there? That's a good clue as-to the condition of the fuel tank. That molded U-shaped hose on-top of the fuel tank? You do not need to spend $ for the Yamaha OEM molded U-shaped hose, just buy a foot of 1/4" I.D. reinforced gas hose from any auto parts store ($1.49/ft. at NAPA) and use that to form a U-loop to go from the gas tank tube to the gas filter. You'll see how-long it needs to-be, to make the U without collapsing/kinking, probably something like 7 or 8 inches.

Another 'save your $' tip: you do not need to buy a OEM Yamaha gas filter, get one like these, they fit perfectly in the allotted space under the frame bracket. Any auto parts store is going to have these, probably for ~$6. You should change yours once a year. The Russell anodized aluminum case, sintered-bronze filter is a good one, and you can disassemble it and replace the element, your local speed shop has those. Some people say, "red is the fastest color."

🏍 VMax gas filter.jpg

I'd be changing-out all fluids in the brakes and clutch. The 'reverse-bleed' (pic #5) is for me the #1 quickest way to get a firm pedal or lever. Fluid in at any bleeder nipple causes any residual air to move upwards (bubbles rise, yes?) and you will notice 'fizzies' emerge from the holes in the floors of the master cylinders. When you have purged all the air, then you will see a geyser of brake fluid (pic #6) as you push fluid uowards from the bleeder nipple from your syringe. When you get to that point, fanning the lever a few times, and you should be rewarded with a furm lever, and restored function to your brakes and clutch.

Here's a shot (pic #4) of a carburetor interior, what do you notice missing?


The rubber plug for the jet block pilot jet. This bike, had it been capable of running (It wasn't) would have-run, 'like-ass,' as my Midlands U.K. mechanic says. Who-knows what abortions the prior owners perpetrated-upon your present ride? I just hope the idiot who 'worked' upon this recent arrival stayed completely-out of the engine.

Here's another pic (#2) of what the prior owner did to 'fix' a presumably-leaking master cylinder fluid level window. I don't know if it's epoxy or body putty. Before this bike is returned to the road, this will be fixed with a watch crystal epoxied in-place, after removing this crap.

I'm also including a pic (#3) of the underside of the carbs. This is how I split the carbs for a tank bath. You don't need to split them into-four.

The last pic (#7) shows a fuel tank/fuel reserve sender unit blank-off plate. I had a really disgusting gummed-up tank on another bike needing lots of attention (notice a pattern?) and I used vinegar after pressure cleaning the tank interior. I neglected to remove the fuel reserve sending unit and after days of vinegar soaking, I found this when I opened the fuel tank. Now I use a blank-off plate.
master cylinder.jpgVMax float bowl vents routing.jpgVMax jet block missing parts.jpgVMax clutch bleed.01.jpgVMax clutch bleed.02.jpgVMax gas sender switch.01.jpg
 
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Maximizer

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if the bike sat for that long, there would be NO gas in the carbs. it would have evaporated long ago. also, if the gas "wasn't that bad" then it definitely didn't sit for four years. did you change the plugs?
 

Fire-medic

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if the bike sat for that long, there would be NO gas in the carbs. it would have evaporated long ago. also, if the gas "wasn't that bad" then it definitely didn't sit for four years. did you change the plugs?
I suspect that the seller probably threw some gas into it to try to start it when he decided to sell it. That's probably the gas the buyer found to-drain.

Spark plugs are cheap, but if it's gonna start, as-long as they don't have barnacles on them, it should start. Without knowing how-long a bike actually sat-up immobile, un-running, I'd be removing the spark plugs to shoot some penetrating oil into the cylinders before I tried to turn-over the engine on the 'electric-foot.' I like PB Blaster.

To-see if an engine is frozen, or not, yank the left-side round crank cover to expose the bolt, I think it's a 17 mm, to turn-over the engine by-hand. If the engine won't turn-over with a socket wrench there, it's a few hundred dollar parts-bike, at-best. The title and the individual parts are where the $ would be at that point.

Since it's apparently-running in some-form, time to clean it up, and to address the problems as you encounter 'em.
 
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Maximizer

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i believe that he said it "runs rough". could be as simple as a fouled plug but going through the carbs is generally the first thing i do after checking for spark. and YES, before you crank a bike that sat for years, spray oil in the cylinders and let it sit for a while. when possible, i will remove the valve cover and shoot the cams with oil too.
 
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Fire-medic

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i will remove the valve cover and shoot the cams with oil too.
I would shoot 'me' with a beer if I was unsuccessful in trying to turn-over an engine, & it was locked-up, if I just paid for it.

For me, a 'pig in a poke' requires papers, and a complete bike, and a really-cheap price.
 

Maximizer

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I would shoot 'me' with a beer if I was unsuccessful in trying to turn-over an engine, & it was locked-up, if I just paid for it.

For me, a 'pig in a poke' requires papers, and a complete bike, and a really-cheap price.
yes, when i buy a 'pig in a poke' i make certain that i can't lose money on it given a worse case scenario.... but a squirt of oil in the cylinders is a good idea even if you let your daily rider sit for a few months.
 

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