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Brake calipers upgrade

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robmac

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If you change the master cylinder to a more modern radial type/matched master the benefits of the R1 calipers are clear over the standard caliper. In saying that 'most' of the riders that I have seen riding a VMax aren't exactly setting the world on fire in relation to the pace they carry so a lot of it is just how they look. Maybe everyone else on the internet/this forum is a gun rider though lol

The 6 piston caliper and whether or not that is an upgrade is debatable too. eg The early Busa had six pots....the newer 4 pots with smaller rotors. The later models have much stronger brakes.

Brembo make some sensational brake calipers....even the motgp one's are 4 pot.
 

Traumahawk

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If you change the master cylinder to a more modern radial type/matched master the benefits of the R1 calipers are clear over the standard caliper. In saying that 'most' of the riders that I have seen riding a VMax aren't exactly setting the world on fire in relation to the pace they carry so a lot of it is just how they look. Maybe everyone else on the internet/this forum is a gun rider though lol

The 6 piston caliper and whether or not that is an upgrade is debatable too. eg The early Busa had six pots....the newer 4 pots with smaller rotors. The later models have much stronger brakes.

Brembo make some sensational brake calipers....even the motgp one's are 4 pot.
I wonder if it comes down to the size of the pistons/area of the pad? The MC would also play into that as well. The Gen 2's....which are heavier (for what they are capable of doing) have 6 pots.
 

02GF74

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Thanx for quick answer. I'm from UK so try find something here. :)
I'm about 20 miles down the road from you.

A while back on a mountain bike forum there was discussion about brake rotor/pad area and surprising as it may be (it was too me!), it does not make a difference* and the equations back it up.

*looking at it simplistically, it is coefficient of friction that makes the difference not area, but as quoted below, other effects and benefits arise with different calliper set ups.
from a car website that summarises it nicely said:
Generally, 4 pot vs 6 pot, you do not really get more braking power. The brake torque remains the same.

Brake torque is dependant on coefficient of friction, force applied, and moment arm.

By increasing the number of pots, you just cause the braking force to be applied more evenly. Or you can fit on a bigger brake pad. This allows the brake to heat up slower (as you have a bigger surface area now) and also can last longer (more material).
Anyways, until my bike is registered, I have time to think and an irrisistible urge to tinker. It appears the same calliper is used on a number of bikes and S/H prices go in line with the performance/price of the bike i.e. callipers from a 'lowly' Fazer 600 are about £ 30 cheaper than from R1 yet they seem to be the same (they certainly use the same pads)

I am considering callipers with the silver anodised covers (since my bike has no blue on it) - very much like the mt07 photo posted above. I *think* the r1 type callipers are slightly lighter which is good for unsprung weight, not that it will be noticeable and IMO look nicer too.
 

Julian Tomkins

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I have the MT/TRACER silver spots on my 1991 bike, I still have the standard size (smaller) discs but bought more modern ones as the original slotted disc was too wide for the new calipers, my son made me some small stainless spacers to fit them, in fact he bought me the calipers after reading about the 'poor' standard calipers that were on my bike, this is the only reason I fitted them,
in all honesty I was quite happy with the standard brakes for my way of riding, yes the newer calipers give more braking but the lever action is rock hard so I fitted an XJR1300 master cylinder which makes braking nice again, of course me being one for even-ness I then had to have a 'matching' XJR clutch master cylinder too
 

02GF74

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ok, so I have the cleanest S/H callipers (and dirtiest tea towel) on this forum .... probably :)
1600973940098.png
but this has go me thinking:
the newer calkipers give more braking but the lever action is rock hard so I fitted an XJR1300 master cylinder which makes braking nice again, of course me being one for even-ness I then had to have a 'matching' XJR clutch master cylinder too
The reason for the above is that the piston area is not the same for the 2 sets of callipers, a bit of research reveals piston diameters:

Vmax 30mm x 1; 34mm x 1 (43 mm rear) total area = 1,615mm2
MT07 27mm x 1; 30mm x 1 (38 mm rear) total area = 1,280mm2 or 80%
YZF750 27mm x 2; 25mm x 1 total area = 1,636mm2 or 101%

So there are 3 options:
1. do nothing
2. replace callipers and see how I get on with the lever travel/feel
3. as 2. but also replace brake and master cylinder (XJR1300 <= hard to find or FJR1300 <= do they have threaded hole for mirror as mirrors were fitted to the plastic fairing)
4. fit 6 pot Sumitomo which look a bit clunky but nothing else needs doing

I prefer the look of MT07 so decisions, decisions....
 
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