Critical Mass Yet Again - ‘90 Gen1

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02GF74

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It looked very much like this, because this is a photo of it.

No windscreen so driving was limited to days in the year when it wasn't raining, so both of them. T'was fun to drive.

Not a caterham but one of quite a few lotus 7 clones.


DSC_0450-2.jpg
 

Screwloose

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It looked very much like this, because this is a photo of it.

No windscreen so driving was limited to days in the year when it wasn't raining, so both of them. T'was fun to drive.

Not a caterham but one of quite a few lotus 7 clones.


View attachment 76259
Gorgeous, must have been very difficult to let it go.
 

02GF74

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Gorgeous, must have been very difficult to let it go.
Funnily enough it was actually, I had listed it for sale for the first time maybe 5 years ago but after driving it a bit in summer/autumn.

Winter is the worst time to sell a car with no roof.

It's gone and life moves on.
 

Screwloose

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A neighbor has a 'bugeye' A-H Sprite and a BMC Mini he takes out on occasional trips around the community. So-cute! It looks like the two take-up as-much space as a Road King with a sidecar, in the driveway.
I detest mini's so much. Helped fix a few of them for friends, engine mount bolt sheers on them. I shamefully owned one for two weeks and hated it, sat in a 1275 GT and thought my buttocks were going to be buffed off at the next bump. The list is endless. I cannot imagine they would be safe in the states, there are ordinary vehicles over there that are 4 times the weight of a mini. I would ban them LoL.
 

Fire-medic

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I detest mini's so much. Helped fix a few of them for friends, engine mount bolt sheers on them. I shamefully owned one for two weeks and hated it, sat in a 1275 GT and thought my buttocks were going to be buffed off at the next bump. The list is endless. I cannot imagine they would be safe in the states, there are ordinary vehicles over there that are 4 times the weight of a mini. I would ban them LoL.
I saw an article about the remake of the movie The Italian Job, and it said the new Mini's used in the subway scenes were actually electric-powered, as the Los Angeles authorities refused to allow internal-combustion engines to be used in the 'tube' (subways, for we who-are Yanks).

I also like the spy novel/movie by Richard Ludlum, of the Jason Bourne series (The Bourne Identity), where he (Matt Damon) runs a BMC Mini very-hard. The gendarmes on their BMW motorcycles don't stand a chance against Jason Bourne behind the wheel of a BMC Mini!
 
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Screwloose

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I saw an article about the remake of the movie The Italian Job, and it said the new Mini's used in the subway scenes were actually electric-powered, as the British authorities refused to allow internal-combustion engines to be used in the 'tube' (subways, for we who-are Yanks).

I also like the spy novel/movie by Richard Ludlum, of the Jason Bourne series, where he runs a BMC Mini very-hard.
I've never thought about the different terminologies for the Tube's. In Glasgow we call them Subways too, and it's printed on the trains. I've been in New York maybe four times, would drive up from New Jersey, and never noticed what they are called there. Anyway never again will I be in a mini.
 

desert_max

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how's the 86 vmax doing?
If you are referring to mine, quite well, thanks! In fact, that machine is the one that “woke the sleeping giant and filled him with a terrible resolve.” (to paraphrase Yamamoto). In other words, it brought me back into the Vmax world after a five year hiatus.

The favorite in my “stable”.
 

Screwloose

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NYC - subway
Boston - T (MBTA)
Chicago - L
LA - Metro
Frisco - BART
Atlanta - MARTA
(Houston - SOL)
I had to look up the Houston subway as I lived there and never came across it. It looks like this is a walkway, but I have to admit I never came across that either. There is not much walking being done there!
 

desert_max

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I had to look up the Houston subway as I lived there and never came across it. It looks like this is a walkway, but I have to admit I never came across that either. There is not much walking being done there!
I lived there for almost 5 years as well. The acronym I used is a common one in the states for “<S>h*t <O>ut of <L>uck.
 

Screwloose

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I lived there for almost 5 years as well. The acronym I used is a common one in the states for “<S>h*t <O>ut of <L>uck.
:) Caught out, and never got that one LoL.

I was saying to myself, Walking in Houston, no way. I got lifted by the police for walking to work in Sugarland and told next time I'm on a plane. I nearly lost the power of my legs living in Houston! Lived in Barker Cyprus for a while and although there are pavements there, everyone comes to their windows to see who this weird person is walking to the pub, and even come back again.
 

Fire-medic

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I have a CD about the smallest city with a subway (historically): Rochester NY. It's no-longer operational, but it's a popular place for explorers of urban archaeology. It was decommissioned when I was a l'il shaver, but pieces are still there, tours of the surviving tunnels are regularly-given. Interestingly, the bed for much of the subway in the city was the abandoned bed of the old Erie Canal.

The Erie Canal was built in the 1820's. Governor DeWitt Clinton fought hard to get federal funding to build it, many members of Congress from other states didn't see the benefit to them to spend $$$$ on it. At that time, the federal government was still paying-off debt from both the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. The NYS Governor's request for funding was the largest expenditure in the history of the country, after defense. However, it was built, and it was one of the main reasons that the Midwest was opened to settlement. The produce from the NYS farmers was able to be brought to market to the east Coast population centers. Rochester became known as 'the Flour City,' because it was the #1 place for grain to flour in the USA, and the Erie Canal helped that product get to urban markets in the east.

Many former students remember the story of 'Johnny Appleseed,' who planted apple tree seedlings across NYS, ostensibly, the thought was, 'because he loved apples and the produce of the apple tree.' 'Johnny Appleseed' loved apples all-right, because he grew the apples and made applejack, an alcoholic beverage which he sold to the workers on the Erie Canal, making him a rich man.
 
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Screwloose

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I have a CD about the smallest city with a subway (historically): Rochester NY. It's no-longer operational, but it's a popular place for explorers of urban archaeology. It was decommissioned when I was a l'il shaver, but pieces are still there, tours of the surviving tunnels are regularly-given. Interestingly, the bed for much of the subway in the city was the abandoned bed of the old Erie Canal.

The Erie Canal was built in the 1820's. Governor DeWitt Clinton fought hard to get federal funding to build it, many members of Congress from other states didn't see the benefit to them to spend $$$$ on it. At that time, the federal government was still paying-off debt from both the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812. The NYS Governor's request for funding was the largest expenditure in the history of the country, after defense. However, it was built, and it was one of the main reasons that the Midwest was opened to settlement. The produce from the NYS farmers was able to be brought to market to the east Coast population centers. Rochester became known as 'the Flour City,' because it was the #1 place for grain to flour in the USA, and the Erie Canal helped that product get to urban markets in the east.

Many former students remember the story of 'Johnny Appleseed,' who planted apple tree seedlings across NYS, ostensibly, the thought was, 'because he loved apples and the produce of the apple tree.' 'Johnny Appleseed' loved apples all-right, because he grew the apples and made applejack, an alcoholic beverage which he sold to the workers on the Erie Canal, making him a rich man.
I’m not going to rush to book a vacation to Rochester to stare at urban archeology (would prefer Florida with the raining females), but I did like, and will remember, the Johnny Appleseed story, and the smallest city with a subway.

Good history there.
 

desert_max

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It’s getting to the point that I would almost take FM up on his offer of 750 bucks for this devil bike. Turns out, he might’ve been right about it!

Had a little time this afternoon, one screw was stuck on the generator cover. It had already been well used, and I finished it off. Then the extraction failed miserably. I can’t catch a break. I might’ve rushed it a little bit. My bad. Now I’m in a world of hurt...
61B4A7E9-8594-4EED-A371-07CEE8E4AE02.jpegE1439D6B-1468-42CE-ADA6-38CE0F692382.jpeg
 

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Screwloose

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It’s getting to the point that I would almost take FM up on his offer of 750 bucks for this devil bike. Turns out, he might’ve been right about it!
These things are sent to try us out. I get this shit all the time mate. Endevour to persevere (Outlaw Josey Wales).

If you want a suggestion then here goes:
For starters I never use these extractors as they are brittle steel and do not twist much before snapping (unlike a threading tap that has some give to it), I've burst a few of these extractors over many years. Now the bit it is stuck I would get a flat punch and give it a few hits with hammer in every direction that I can get a hit, it will loosen. Then if the hex head is chewed up, get the next size up spline head, or torx head bit (good quality product) and drive this in to cut a new location, by hitting the new bit in hard you will also shock the bolt loose. I do this allot when I come across this stuff (when I chew up an internal hex head) and I've always got them out. You can re-use the bolt afterwards as it has a low torque, and it's not an area where you explore very often, unless you really enjoy going in there every week for some odd reason.

I admit to having a extensive Snapon tool kit that gives me the advantage of cutting new surfaces by driving sockets etc into sizes they should not be driven into, but I do a similair routine at least every year.

There will be dozens of ways of doing this, but the above is just what I do on a fairly regular basis.

Hope this helps a bit with the thought process.
 

desert_max

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Thanks buddy. With a handle like Screwloose, I should have imagined you 'd have a story or two along these lines.

Yes, these miserable extractors are made out of glass. I should have known. That, coupled with the fact that the screw Is really jammed sealed my fate. I've already had the flat punch after it and still haven't managed to loosen up the broken bit. Still working at it. That's why the two shots above show different characteristics as the situation evolves.

Thanks again for the tboughs, SL.
 

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