Dan Gurney loved bikes and as a driver he won two of the world's biggest races-in one week!

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Fire-medic

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Dan Gurney created the 'spray the people with the champagne' move after winning a F1 race (1967, Spa, Belgium) in his Eagle car, designed by his own company, and made of magnesium and titanium, to lighten the car, since it had its roots in his Indy car design; the exotic metals were to lighten it compared to the European and Asian F1 cars competing against it. He was on a high-note as the prior week, he drove a Ford GT40 with AJ Foyt, and they won the LeMans 24 Hours race. Hear Gurney recall the week he was the best in the world, in F1 and prototype sportscars.
Remembering Dan Gurney's 1967 Golden Week (roadandtrack.com)

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How good was Gurney's Eagle open-wheeled racer? In the 1973 Indy 500 twenty of the thirty-three racers drove Eagles.

Gurney had a feet-forward design he experimented with, the 'Alligator.' There were various versions of it, and they are collectibles today. They often used singles for power.

Driven to Ride: Dan Gurney's Passion for Motorcycles- Special Feature | Cycle World

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Dig those lace-up race shoes! Note both wheels are off the ground.

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Gurney's design has often been called the world's most-beautiful open-wheeled racer.
 
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apsolus

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hell yeah didnt he race the gt40 against Lamborghini or something?
 

Fire-medic

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Lamborghini didn't race his cars, private owners did at various points, but the company was not geared towards a factory race effort. Lamborghini decided to build sportscars because he had a crummy experience with his Ferrari, and supposedly said, "I can do-better!" In many people's minds he did.

Ferrari lived to race his cars, selling cars was his way to fund the race team in F1. The sports cars he raced and sold to racers and to street-operable car owners was all geared towards perfecting his F1 efforts.
 
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