Front end wobbly

Discussion in 'Suspension' started by protegeV, Jun 25, 2020.

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  1. Jun 25, 2020 #1

    protegeV

    protegeV

    protegeV

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    Just picked up a 2000 vmax with low miles on it last week and I finally got to take it on a ride. I noticed the front end feels pretty unstable when hitting bumps at highway speeds. Also, when taking a corner the front end wants to dive into the turn and I have to pull back against my lean.
     
  2. Jun 25, 2020 #2

    desert_max

    desert_max

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    Tire air pressure?
     
  3. Jun 25, 2020 #3

    protegeV

    protegeV

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    I made sure air pressure was correct in both tires before riding.
     
  4. Jun 25, 2020 #4

    desert_max

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    Hmm. Well, could be a couple things. I'd put it on the centerstand and start scrutinizing head stem bearings and wheel bearings. Likely one or the other.
     
  5. Jun 25, 2020 #5

    Fire-medic

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    How-much air pressure in the forks? That makes a huge difference on mine. Believe it's up-to 15 PSI, so somewhere 5-15 PSI. Be-careful if you use a compressor to air-up the forks, it only takes a fraction of a second to air them-up as it's a very-small volume. People have blown-out their fork seals, treating it like a truck tire.

    Progressive Suspension fork spring kits I think don't require air pressure.

    Jack the front end off the ground, grab the bottoms of the fork sliders, and push/pull the towards/away from you. They should not have any appreciable travel forward/back, there should not be any 'clunk' with movement. If there is, your steering head bearings are loose, and probably shot. Time to look at Sean Morley's 'bounce-test' video on youtube for your forks, too. You can watch his daughter disassemble a VMax fork, so-can you!
     
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  6. Jun 25, 2020 #6

    protegeV

    protegeV

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    THANK YOU! I will check the front end when I get home tonight.
     
  7. Jun 25, 2020 #7

    Pighuntingpuppy

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    What shape and age is the tires in? Could be as simple as a bad tire as well. Checking things is free. Better than shotgunning a bunch of parts at it first. When you get home, centerstand, check steering bearings as mentioned(really good advice even if they arent loose). Tire age and condition. And remember, even new tires can be bad.
     
  8. Jun 25, 2020 #8

    protegeV

    protegeV

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    The front tire is actually almost 10 years old. I already have new tires on order. I will check the front end and revisit this after the tires are installed. I've ridden bikes with old tires, but never felt anything like this before.
     
  9. Jun 25, 2020 #9

    Fire-medic

    Fire-medic

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    Oh, geez, ten years-old tires are not good on a powerful cruiser, any bike really. They get dried-out, they lose pliability, and ozone in the atmosphere causes a deterioration of the rubber, as does UV light. New premium tires are a great investment, switching to radial tires f & r (requiring a new rear wheel custom-made, there are no direct swaps which work) will give you a whole new world of handling and performance; the bike will steer better and corner better. However, at this point any new tires are better than what you have. They should be sticky rubber, even-if you get less-miles out of them. A hard-rubber ('distance' tire) compound will step-out on you when you use too-much throttle, and do it suddenly, especially when cornering.
     
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