Hi all , front tyre size, Took my bike to the shop for a new front tyre.

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Fire-medic

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110/90-V18, so you got a higher speed rating as Z >V. The profile is 80-series instead of 90-series, so it's a bit shorter in height, compared to width. Not a major significant difference with which to be concerned. If you were a canyon-carver, your cornering clearance might be a bit-less but for most of the VMax rider population, again, not an issue. Your replacement tire now-installed is a better-specification than OEM.

I like the mill-finish aluminum engine as an alternative to the OEM black finish.
 
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Whiteflys

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Hi , thanks for that , I didnt check until I got home and noticeds I had more clearance on the front guard to tyre. More on cornering clearance ? I like to ride hard at times. Just finished the bike , Barnett clutch kit carbo, 444 progressives on the rear , Racetec racing front springs rebuilt and lots of cosmetic uprades I did myself
 
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02GF74

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Your speedo will read a tad higher
Hope I got this the right way round but you will be less likely to get a ticket for speeding as you'll be going slower than the speed shown on the speedo.

Front wheel is 11mm (just under 1/2 in) closer to the ground.
 

Easydrifter

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Speaking of front tires, how do you guys think a 100/90/18 would be on the front of a 2001 VMax? Too skinny or OK? I might get one just because it would match the Pirelli MT66 Route that I just put on the back.
 

Fire-medic

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Not offered in 110/90-V18"?

The bike will steer a bit quicker, because it's narrower. I think it's a good thing having the construction and rubber compound the same, as I've seen bikes become really-bad handling because of mixing different types of construction and rubber.

Check this out, permitted tires for a 2.15" wheel width are anywhere from 3.25" to 4.75"
Motorcycle Tire Sizes Explained | Dennis Kirk

OEM wheel in-front is a 2.15 X 18"
 
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Easydrifter

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Not offered in 110/90-V18"?

The bike will steer a bit quicker, because it's narrower. I think it's a good thing having the construction and rubber compound the same, as I've seen bikes become really-bad handling because of mixing different types of construction and rubber.

Check this out, permitted tires for a 2.15" wheel width are anywhere from 3.25" to 4.75"
Motorcycle Tire Sizes Explained | Dennis Kirk

OEM wheel in-front is a 2.15 X 18"
Not offered in 110/90-V18"?

The bike will steer a bit quicker, because it's narrower. I think it's a good thing having the construction and rubber compound the same, as I've seen bikes become really-bad handling because of mixing different types of construction and rubber.

Check this out, permitted tires for a 2.15" wheel width are anywhere from 3.25" to 4.75"
Motorcycle Tire Sizes Explained | Dennis Kirk

OEM wheel in-front is a 2.15 X 18"
I haven't been able to find a Pirelli MT66 Route in 110/90/18 so apparently they are not available, only offered in a 100/90/18. I'll probably just run with the Michelin 110/90/18 Commander 2 that came with the bike for awhile. I do like matching sets though. Too bad I had to replace the 170/80/15 Commander 2 that was on the back. The Pirelli 150/90/15 that I put on the rear must be a smaller diameter, I noticed my revs are higher cruising on the hiway now (not exactly a good thing). I know I replaced a $200. tire with a $100. tire but I put a pair of these Route 66 tires on my old Goldwing before and never had a problem with them. Thanks for the good info on Dennis Kirk.
 

Whiteflys

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110/90-V18, so you got a higher speed rating as Z >V. The profile is 80-series instead of 90-series, so it's a bit shorter in height, compared to width. Not a major significant difference with which to be concerned. If you were a canyon-carver, your cornering clearance might be a bit-less but for most of the VMax rider population, again, not an issue. Your replacement tire now-installed is a better-specification than OEM.

I like the mill-finish aluminum engine as an alternative to the OEM black finish.
 
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CaptainKyle

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Speaking of front tires, how do you guys think a 100/90/18 would be on the front of a 2001 VMax? Too skinny or OK? I might get one just because it would match the Pirelli MT66 Route that I just put on the back.
I have ran plenty of 100's & personally like them. It does feel like it quickens up the steering a hair in my opinion.
 

Easydrifter

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That sounds encouraging, I might just order one to match my new back tire. It won't cost much because I have my own tire irons and balancer. Thanks
 

aikidoka

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Hi , thanks for that , I didnt check until I got home and noticeds I had more clearance on the front guard to tyre. More on cornering clearance ? I like to ride hard at times. Just finished the bike , Barnett clutch kit carbo, 444 progressives on the rear , Racetec racing front springs rebuilt and lots of cosmetic uprades I did myself

beautiful vmax!!
 

Smithjs35

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Speaking of tyres, my 2000 vmax carbon with 13k miles went into a death wobble around 90-95 mph. Scared the .. out of me. Bought bike on line sight unseen so I don't know much about the maintenance. Bridgestone Exedra on front @ 33 psi. Any idea of what to check first. Steering bearings, forks or tire? Bike has center stand removed so I have not checked steering bearing play which maybe the culprit or air pressure in the forks. Obviously newer vmax rider!
 

Fire-medic

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Check play in the front wheel bearings, and the setup of your front steering stem. A worn, hard-rubber old tire with cupping showing isn't gonna help you steer.

Use the 'advanced search' function (after clicking on the upper-right 'search') for info on doing the 'bounce test' for your front forks. Also look at info on the air in your forks which should be somewhere between 5-15 PSI assuming you do not have Progressive Suspension fork springs in it. PS does not recomment using pressure in the downtube schrader valves.

Any fork seal leakage evident? Pitted downtubes and leaking fork seals means new downtubes are needed, along with replacement of fork seals, and the correct amount of fork oil of the proper viscosity.

Print-out this and put it into a 3 ring binder, you will be referring to it often during ownership: VMX12- Service-Manual.pdf (vmoa.net)

Switching to a different wheel in the rear (17" or 18") will allow you to use radial tires, which I consider the #1 best improvement if you intend to ride at higher speeds. The front can use a radial tire, though the width of the 18" front at 2.15" is not optimum as it should be whatever the tire manufacturer specifies for the one you select, probably 3-1/2". You probably will have trouble finding a 18" 90-series front tire 110, and it's important to have the front and rear rubber constructions the same, (radial tires, same manufacturer, same method of construction, and complimentary rubber compounds), our bikes work best with softer rubber for better roadholding. Harder rubber doesn't offer as-much grip, and you can lose traction easily while turning, or by grabbing a big handful of throttle with that.
 
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Easydrifter

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Speaking of tyres, my 2000 vmax carbon with 13k miles went into a death wobble around 90-95 mph. Scared the .. out of me. Bought bike on line sight unseen so I don't know much about the maintenance. Bridgestone Exedra on front @ 33 psi. Any idea of what to check first. Steering bearings, forks or tire? Bike has center stand removed so I have not checked steering bearing play which maybe the culprit or air pressure in the forks. Obviously newer vmax rider!
Smith, I just bought a 2001 model like yours. I hauled it home 200 miles in the back of my pickup. The next day on my first ride on the hiway it started wobbling at anything over 90 mph. When I got home and checked the tire pressure I found that the back tire had almost no pressure at all in it. I found that it had a screw and also a piece of wire embedded in the center of the tread, so I pulled them out and put 2 plugs in the tire and rode it like that for a few days, no more wobble. Then I replaced the tire with a Pirelli MT66 Route tire. No more problem.
 

Smithjs35

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Check play in the front wheel bearings, and the setup of your front steering stem. A worn, hard-rubber old tire with cupping showing isn't gonna help you steer.

Use the 'advanced search' function (after clicking on the upper-right 'search') for info on doing the 'bounce test' for your front forks. Also look at info on the air in your forks which should be somewhere between 5-15PSI assuming you do not have Progressive Suspension fork springs in it.

Any fork seal leakage evident? Pitted downtubes and leaking fork seals means new downtubes are needed, along with replacement of fork seals, and the correct amount of fork oil of the proper viscosity.

Print-out this and put it into a 3 ring binder, you will be referring to it often during ownership: VMX12- Service-Manual.pdf (vmoa.net)
Thank you so much for the help, front tire feel like a brick with good tread, bike definitely grabs every line or gouge in the road. No visible leakage around fork seals and just purchased low pressure hand pump to check fork air pressure. Bike corners hard and doesn't like bumps either hits hard. Something is not right, air may help but I have no idea about condition of the oil and the hard front tire needs to go. Thanks again, will follow advice given and that advice was really appreciated .
 

Fire-medic

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Buy the best name-brand sporting rubber you can find, in bias-ply, if going to radials isn't in the financial plans now. Try playing with the rear shock damping, set them full-soft, and get a bit of road time in, then switch them to the next-stiffer damping (the top collar, numbered 1-4) and also try playing around with the pre-load on the spring (the bottom collar with holes to pre-load the spring). Do one thing at a time, so you can see the effect each individual change makes. If you ride on the same section of road, with some bumps and both L and R turns, you will soon see what each setting does, or doesn't do, for your handling.
 

Smithjs35

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Buy the best name-brand sporting rubber you can find, in bias-ply, if going to radials isn't in the financial plans now. Try playing with the rear shock damping, set them full-soft, and get a bit of road time in, then switch them to the next-stiffer damping (the top collar, numbered 1-4) and also try playing around with the pre-load on the spring (the bottom collar with holes to pre-load the spring). Do one thing at a time, so you can see the effect each individual change makes. If you ride on the same section of road, with some bumps and both L and R turns, you will soon see what each setting does, or doesn't do, for your handling.
Thanks so much for the support, vmax people and motorcyclist in general are in a class of their on for sure !
 

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