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Parminio

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You can buy them here in the U.S. and import them for less than you buy one there.

I have a completely perfect 2007 with 15,000 miles on it. No way I get more than about 5,500 dollars for it. Not unless somebody has no idea what they're doing, that is.

For the price that nimrod is asking, you could buy mine, import it, pay the fees on it, then supercharge it and still have the money to go on a nice holiday road trip.
 

02GF74

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You can buy them here in the U.S. and import them for less than you buy one there.
Yep, that's exactly what I've done. Mine is imported from Japan, originally for the Canadian market that was made in Japan, so we'll travelled.
 

tinman22

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so if i'm reading this correctly (if im not let me know). starting in 2007 the registered bikes have been gradually turned into sorn bikes? very interesting if thats correct.

unfortunately it does not bode well for the investment potential of mr. max as it risks becoming a beenie baby.

fantastic that that information is available.
 

02GF74

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The site uses data from government but depends on whether the vehicles are registered correctly.

But generally you can see SORN go up with a corresponding decrease in MOT as presumably bikes are taken off the road in winter.

But yes, it does appear that the trend is to store rather than ride.

The same trend for gen 2.
Screenshot_20210108-210446.png
 

Screwloose

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Trigger is always on sorn in the U.K. during the winter. I do this for a few reasons; one is that I have creaky knees from riding all weathers and had ops on both, next is that I try to keep Trigger from rotting away, then I’m getting to that age where I feel the cold more, next is that by using sorn and if someone strong enough decided to steal Trigger (Arny/Stallone) then every NPR (number place recognition) system in the U.K. will act as my personal tracker for free!

For instance phone the police that your bike is stolen and they MAY come out in a couple of days, but if the NPR vehicles pick it up and see the possibility of a fine (money) then the the sirens are on with hot pursuit.
There is madness in my methods.
 

stevewgardner

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Triumph 200 Super Cub was my first...there was a love/hate relationship...and I have the permanently broken toe to prove how short the starter was and how badly it would kick back. That crappy old piece of junk...I hated that thing...wish I had it now.
 

Fire-medic

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I didn't own a Triumph Cub, but from reading about them, they were a very-popular UK ride. Alf Hagon, a legend in all-sorts of motorcycle competition., competed on them early in his career, and the Hagon business still sells parts for them.

I once bought a TR25W 250cc Triumph from a co-worker, he bought it new. He used to ride it to work, until one day he had a minor accident. He parked the bike and after sitting in a shed for decades, he decided to re-commission it. I had to un-stick the piston, the engine was frozen. That took my oxy-acetylene torch, a pressure-treated 4x4 block and a BFH to finally-free it. I probably could have just bored it (had it done, I am not a machinist) but I found cylinder liners were available, I did that. The rest of the bike wasn't bad, it actually withstood the long time in dry storage well. He rode it for a bit, and offered it to me for what I charged him for the work. I eventually sold it to some British guys who came-to Florida and bought a 40 ft. container's full of motorcycles to ship-back to England, where they fixed 'em and sold 'em.

MY 360 Yamaha dirt bike, bought new, once kicked-back on me during a near-winter enduro in Muskegon Michigan, it was called the 'Pearl Harbor Enduro' because it was on Dec.7. I was stopped in a powerline right of way which had about a 6" flood of frigid water below a thin layer of ice. You could look down the powerline right of way, and see all the stalled-out bikes littering the path. "I have plenty of power, I'll get right-through this!" I said to myself. I made it about 75 yards down the enduro route before the bike lost momentum and stopped. A guy on a TS250 Suzuki stopped a few feet behind me, and we decided there was no-way we were going to be able to get down that. We took turns getting our bikes out of that frozen water, and that's where trying to kick-start my bike, the kick-back for-which the 360 Yamaha bikes were known-for, ripped clean-off the heel of my engineer's boot. They had a compression release on the left handlebar, you had to de-coke the mechanism mounted on the front of the cylinder or it wouldn't work. Ah, two-strokes! I still have the bike. My friend with-whom I would attend enduros and hare scrambles, placed that day. He raced a Yamaha 360 MX or a Rickman 125cc, depending on if it was a tight, 'woods' course, or a more-open course where the 360 MX could make good time, it would do an honest 91 mph, fast for an early 1970's off-road bike.
 
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stevewgardner

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I didn't own a Triumph Cub, but from reading about them, they were a very-popular UK ride. Alf Hagon, a legend in all-sorts of motorcycle competition., competed on them early in his career, and the Hagon business still sells parts for them.

I once bought a TR25W 250cc Triumph from a co-worker, he bought it new. He used to ride it to work, until one day he had a minor accident. He parked the bike and after sitting in a shed for decades, he decided to re-commission it. I had to un-stick the piston, the engine was frozen. That took my oxy-acetylene torch, a pressure-treated 4x4 block and a BFH to finally-free it. I probably could have just bored it (had it done, I am not a machinist) but I found cylinder liners were available, I did that. The rest of the bike wasn't bad, it actually withstood the long time in dry storage well. He rode it for a bit, and offered it to me for what I charged him for the work. I eventually sold it to some British guys who came-to Florida and bought a 40 ft. container's full of motorcycles to ship-back to England, where they fixed 'em and sold 'em.

MY 360 Yamaha dirt bike, bought new, once kicked-back on me during a near-winter enduro in Muskegon Michigan, it was called the 'Pearl Harbor Enduro' because it was on Dec.7. I was stopped in a powerline right of way which had about a 6" flood of frigid water below a thin layer of ice. You could look down the powerline right of way, and see all the stalled-out bikes littering the path. "I have plenty of power, I'll get right-through this!" I said to myself. I made it about 75 yards down the enduro route before the bike lost momentum and stopped. A guy on a TS250 Suzuki stopped a few feet behind me, and we decided there was no-way we were going to be able to get down that. We took turns getting our bikes out of that frozen water, and that's where trying to kick-start my bike, the kick-back for-which the 360 Yamaha bikes were known-for, ripped clean-off the heel of my engineer's boot. They had a compression release on the left handlebar, you had to de-coke the mechanism mounted on the front of the cylinder or it wouldn't work. Ah, two-strokes! I still have the bike. My friend with-whom I would attend enduros and hare scrambles, placed that day. He raced a Yamaha 360 MX or a Rickman 125cc, depending on if it was a tight, 'woods' course, or a more-open course where the 360 MX could make good time, it would do an honest 91 mph, fast for an early 1970's off-road bike.
Good stuff, Fire-medic. I enjoyed it. I rode a Yamerhammer 250 MX for some time on trails, motocross, and cross country. Good bike. Old memories. I try not to drift off into stories...nobody wants to hear the reminiscing of an old fighter aviator...in fact, my war stories even bore me. Don't get me started. ;-)
 

Fire-medic

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Good stuff, Fire-medic. I enjoyed it. I rode a Yamerhammer 250 MX for some time on trails, motocross, and cross country. Good bike. Old memories. I try not to drift off into stories...nobody wants to hear the reminiscing of an old fighter aviator...in fact, my war stories even bore me. Don't get me started. ;-)
Got any gun-camera footage?

I just read this book, filled-with "reminiscing of an old Naval fighter aviator":
Feet Wet by Paul Gillcrist, Rear Admiral, USN (Ret.) goes from the early days of jets in military aviation, to days/nights of the 'flying brick,' F4; the A-6 and the F-8, he said a fellow aviator described it "like flying a barrel of turds," but that "it came-off the catapult like a dream." Yes, flying in Vietnam off the USS Bonhomme Richard, at Yankee Station. Plenty of dogfight descriptions, and stories of bombing North Vietnam. He said the air corridor over Hanoi was "the most heavily-fortified anti-aircraft encampment in the world."
 

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