Coolant elbow

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Poolio

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In the process of removing the coolant elbow and the attaching pieces after it. Tube, thermostat etc. is their a cheaper thermostat than a oem one that can be used? Also before I go opening up the water pump, the engine is new. What is the process to get that elbow off? Any help would be appreciated
 

VMAXXIMUM

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Poolio I just recently needed to change the pump side o-ring on the elbow. You have to remove the water pump. The two middle water pump cover bolts go all the way thru the pump and must be removed along with the bolts on the perimeter of the pump. Once off the elbow can be pulled out.
 

Fire-medic

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Poolio

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Poolio I just recently needed to change the pump side o-ring on the elbow. You have to remove the water pump. The two middle water pump cover bolts go all the way thru the pump and must be removed along with the bolts on the perimeter of the pump. Once off the elbow can be pulled out.
Thank you, did you reuse the outer gasket or replace it? I’m not looking at the manual yet so I’m not sure it has one. I ordered. The two elbow o rings and the two gaskets for the thermostat so far. I only buy oem gaskets but by no means was buying a oem thermostat. Price was crazy
 

Screwloose

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Gaskets are fairly easy ti make yourself, there are a couple of tricks to it. Get back if u decide to make your own and want some tips.
 

Fire-medic

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Gaskets are fairly easy ti make yourself, there are a couple of tricks to it. Get back if u decide to make your own and want some tips.
A good excuse to drink a beer!

ladder fiberglass.01.jpg lawnmower gasket.jpg

I've used a thin skin of water-soluble gel lubricant to hold in-place a gasket for reassembly, a technique shown to me by my friend from the U.K.-Birmingham, at his Ft. Lauderdale FL area shop. I have a few punches for holes. A sharp blade in an Xacto knife helps to cut-out the shape. I use a machinist's steel ruler too to guide the blade, and selecting the proper socket to use for the same thing at rounded corners works well also.
 
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Screwloose

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A good excuse to drink a beer!

View attachment 78619 View attachment 78620

I've used a thin skin of water-soluble gel lubricant to hold in-place a gasket for reassembly, a technique shown to me by my friend from the U.K.-Birmingham, at his Ft. Lauderdale FL area shop. I have a few punches for holes. A sharp blade in an Xacto knife helps to cut-out the shape. I use a machinist's steel ruler too to guide the blade, and selecting the proper socket to use for the same thing at rounded corners works well also.
Very similar. I use pipes ground to a point to cut out holes (probably you meant that), with sometimes a ball bearing on a nut or similar when i do not have suitable pipe sizes. Then i put grease on the metal surface, and stick the gasket on, allowing to see where to cut out internally everything else to size. Its just time, but saves a fortune. By the time you drink two cans of lager a gasket is made. 😀
 

Fire-medic

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Yep, a sense of satisfaction and shekels stay in your pocket (you would be buying the beer anyway, this is 'value-added' content when you recycle the cardboard).

Do you ever use a block of wood and the part to be gasketed beneath it, to lightly transfer the shape of the part to the gasket material? A thin coating of paint, and then the tap-tap-tap of the part, and your shape transfers to the gasket material is another method.
 

Screwloose

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Do you ever use a block of wood and the part to be gasketed beneath it, to lightly transfer the shape of the part to the gasket material? A thin coating of paint, and then the tap-tap-tap of the part, and your shape transfers to the gasket material is another method.
I see what you mean about the wood method. That may be a better method than my grease one, as I always have it in the back of my head I could be contaminating the gasket in some way, but doing it dry sounds good. 👍
 
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