Can I throw away wire between clutch discs? who did that?

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DreamV4

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It seemed like clutch discs were frozen, so I removed discs until wire. How many discs should be in there?
 

Fire-medic

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C'mon man, bring up a dealer fiche and find out for yourself. Or look in the service manual; look at the exploded diagram. Removing the 1/2 width friction disc & that wire, you insert a full-width replacement.
 

DreamV4

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there was some rust on steels, but friction discs looked new. Transmission worked fine. Maybe previous guy didn't soak discs in oil.
 

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I would get rid of the wire, and the clutch boss spring, and the spring seat, and then get a full size friction plate. I wouldn't bother with the full DD upgrade though. Basically, do everything per the attachment except add a 2nd diaphragm spring.
 

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Fire-medic

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That baked clutch in Lvlhead's write-up saw some abuse!

VMax Lvlhead clutch abuse.png

A pretty blue-anodized Barnett pressure plate. All it needs is a spiral artwork, from the center-out, like the nose cone on this WWII fighter. Get one of those Exactrep windowed clutch case covers, and watch the revolutions.

VMax Barnett  pressure plate.png
Messerschmitt BF-109.png

If you want a thinner graphic, consider this one I shot at the New Orleans WWII Museum.

Messerschmitt BF 109 New Orleans WW II Museum.jpg
 
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VMAXXIMUM

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That baked clutch in Lvlhead's write-up saw some abuse!

View attachment 79592

A pretty blue-anodized Barnett pressure plate. All it needs is a spiral artwork, from the center-out, like the nose cone on this WWII fighter. Get one of those Exactrep windowed clutch case covers, and watch the revolutions.

View attachment 79593
View attachment 79594

If you want a thinner graphic, consider this one I shot at the New Orleans WWII Museum.

View attachment 79595
That was, one of, if not the best museum experience I've ever had. I could have spent days in that place.
 

Fire-medic

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That was, one of, if not the best museum experience I've ever had. I could have spent days in that place.
Did you get the ticket which allows you to access things in the museum on your computer afterwards?

Speaking of museums, here's an article on the internet today. Remembering Marvin Tamaroff, innovative car dealer and mascot-collector extraordinaire (msn.com) This fellow became a fabulously-successful auto dealer, after starting out as a new car salesman. He soon decided that being a used-car dealer was a better money-maker. He did well, and was able to become a new car dealer for many brands, including Honda, when they offered one solitary automobile for sale in the United States. Detroit today has his dealerships and many others, along Telegraph Road.

The article mentioned Tamaroff's collection of radiator mascots. When the radiator was at the front of the bodywork, and the radiator cap was part of the exposed body, people would often personalize their cars with a replacement radiator cap. The MotoMeter was a popular one, it showed temperature in the cooling system. Many radiator 'mascots,' they were called, were in the shape of animals, others were ships, planes, and other symbols of power, speed, and grace.

A French crystal manufacturer made for the rich, a number of crystal radiator mascots. This was Lalique, and as the article mentions, a complete collection of <30 Lalique crystal figurines from the 1920's sold in 2000 for $550,000. Who owned that collection? Marvin Tamaroff was the seller! He donated his collection of radiator mascots and emblems from various vintage vehicles to the Gilmore Car Museum, in s.w. Michigan.

The Gilmore Car Museum was recently mentioned as one of the best auto museums in the country. A week ago, that's where I was. Look above the roof of the yellow Auburn Speedster, a supercharged street car was a rarity in the 1930's. You can see the building devoted to the Antique Automobile Club of America (AACA) signage, mentioned in the article. That's where the Tamaroff collection of automobile medallions, badges, and yes, radiator mascots are located. It was the grand re-opening of the AACA building after an extensive renovation. Here are a few other pics from the Gilmore, they had an exhibit devoted to the Corvette.

Ever-see a six-passenger C1 Corvette, made by GM? Here's one called the Corvette Nomad, a concept car for a famous auto exhibit (the GM Motorama) from GM in the early 1950's. They also made a Corvette 'Corvair,' another C1 Corvette, as a fastback, a full 10 years before the 1963 split-window coupe was released to the public.

Here is one of their motorcycles, a 1912 Pierce, yes, the same manufacturer, in Buffalo NY of the Pierce-Arrow automobile, a favorite of American champion driver in F1 and other racing series, Phil Hill, who was a F1 driver for Ferrari. He often served as a judge for concours events where Pierce-Arrows were present.

Auburn Speedster-supercharged.jpg Corvette Nomad.jpg Corvette Motorama Corvair.01.jpg Corvette Motorama Corvair.02.jpg Pierce 1912.jpg

Check out their website. If you ever get to s.w. MI, be sure to give yourself a full afternoon to see it. For me, a whole day would be better.
 
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